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  • July 24, 2014

    Making science useful

    Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are warming up our planet and causing climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, launched in July 2014, is tracking this carbon dioxide from space, enabling us to better predict the rate of build-up of carbon dioxide and its impact on our climate. Karen Yuen, Science Data Applications Lead for the mission, gives us her perspective.

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  • July 24, 2014

    Parched West is using up underground water

    A new study finds more than 75 percent of recent water loss from the Colorado River Basin came from underground sources, with grave implications for the West's water supply.

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  • July 22, 2014

    Earth has hottest June on record, according to NOAA

    According to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the combined average temperature over the Earth's land and ocean surfaces for June 2014 was the highest on record for the month.

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  • July 18, 2014

    OCO-2 data to lead scientists forward into the past

    Scientists will use a virtual time machine to trace carbon dioxide observations from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 back to their sources.

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  • July 17, 2014

    A 10-year endeavor: NASA’s Aura and climate change

    Celebrating its tenth anniversary this week, NASA’s Aura satellite and its four onboard instruments measure some of the climate agents in the atmosphere including greenhouse gases, clouds and dust particles.

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  • July 15, 2014

    The air we breathe

    Our atmosphere is vital to all living things on our planet. How much do you know about the air we breathe?

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  • July 10, 2014

    What's your carbon I.Q.?

    Earth has many processes that regular carbon, atmospheric carbon dioxide and its role in the carbon cycle and climate. How much do you know?

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  • July 7, 2014

    NASA's RapidScat to unveil hidden cycles of sea winds

    In a few months, NASA will send an ocean wind-monitoring instrument to a berth on the International Space Station. That unique vantage point will give ISS-RapidScat, short for the International Space Station Rapid Scatterometer, the ability to observe daily (also called diurnal) cycles of wind created by solar heat.

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  • July 3, 2014

    OCO-2 joins the A-Train to study Earth’s atmosphere

    Every day, above our planet, five Earth-observing satellites rush along like trains on the same “track,” flying minutes, and sometimes seconds, behind one another. They carry more than 15 scientific instruments in total, looking at many different aspects of our home planet. Called the Afternoon Constellation, or A-Train, these satellites work as a united, powerful tool for advancing our understanding of Earth’s surface and atmosphere.

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  • July 2, 2014

    Beautiful Earth: Great Salt Desert, Iran

    Earth is a beautiful place. Here's our image of the month.

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  • July 2, 2014

    NASA launches carbon mission to watch Earth breathe

    NASA successfully launched its first spacecraft dedicated to studying atmospheric carbon dioxide at 2:56 a.m. PDT (5:56 a.m. EDT) Tuesday.

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  • June 30, 2014

    How much do you know about carbon? Test your knowledge

    Earth has many processes that regulate carbon, atmospheric carbon dioxide and its role in the carbon cycle and climate. How much do you know?

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  • June 30, 2014

    Infographic: Measuring carbon dioxide from space

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide is at its highest level in human history and is changing our climate before our eyes. NASA's new Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) space satellite will probe the carbon cycle like never before, telling us where the carbon is going and giving us clues as to where we will end up.

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  • June 26, 2014

    NASA's OCO-2 will track our impact on airborne carbon

    Where does all of the natural and human-emitted carbon dioxide go after it enters or leaves the atmosphere? NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) will find out, come July 1.

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  • June 25, 2014

    NASA's OCO-2 observatory ready for launch

    The launch of NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission (OCO-2) at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California, is scheduled for Tuesday, July 1.

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  • June 23, 2014

    Data, data, data

    Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are warming up our planet and causing climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, launching in July 2014, will track this carbon dioxide from space, enabling us to better predict the rate of build-up of carbon dioxide and its impact on our climate. We spoke to project scientist Mike Gunson to get his take on the mission just a week before launch.

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  • June 23, 2014

    Earth Right Now: Your planet is changing. We're on it.

    With the launch of five Earth-observing missions in 2014 — more Earth-focused launches in a single year in more than a decade — NASA will be able to deliver even more crucial data to scientists trying to understand our changing planet. Since the agency's inception in 1958, NASA has established itself as a world leader in Earth science and climate studies.

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  • June 16, 2014

    Man on a mission

    Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are warming up our planet and causing climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, launching in July 2014, will track this carbon dioxide from space, enabling us to better predict the rate of build-up of carbon dioxide and its impact on our climate. Dave Crisp, Science Lead for the project, is determined to make the mission a success.

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  • June 12, 2014

    New NASA space observatory to study carbon conundrums

    NASA's first spacecraft dedicated to measuring carbon dioxide levels in Earth's atmosphere is in final preparations for a July 1 launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

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  • June 12, 2014

    Beautiful Earth: Icefall

    Earth is a beautiful place. Here's our image of the month.

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  • June 3, 2014

    Making good science happen

    Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are warming up our planet and causing climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, launching in July 2014, will track this carbon dioxide from space, enabling us to better predict the rate of build-up of carbon dioxide and its impact on our climate. Annmarie Eldering, the project's Deputy Scientist, is working to make the science a reality.

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  • May 22, 2014

    The making of NASA's Global Selfie: 100+ countries, thousands of photos

    On Earth Day this year, NASA asked people all around the world a simple question — “Where are you on Earth Right Now?” We asked people to answer the question on social media, with a selfie. The goal was to use each picture as a pixel in the creation of a “Global Selfie” — a mosaic image that would look like Earth appeared from space on Earth Day.

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  • May 20, 2014

    Unfinished business

    Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere are warming up our planet and causing climate change. The Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 mission, launching in July 2014, will track this carbon dioxide from space, enabling us to better predict the rate of build-up of carbon dioxide and its impact on our climate. For Ralph Basilio, manager of the mission, the upcoming launch is unfinished business.

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  • May 19, 2014

    Hidden Greenland canyons mean more sea level rise

    Scientists at NASA and the University of California, Irvine (UCI), have found that canyons under Greenland's ocean-feeding glaciers are deeper and longer than previously thought, increasing the amount of Greenland's estimated contribution to future sea level rise.

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  • May 14, 2014

    Satellites see potential for major El Niño

    Data from ocean-observing satellites and other ocean sensors indicate that El Niño conditions appear to be developing in the equatorial Pacific Ocean.

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