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Welcome to Climate Reel, a collection of NASA's best videos and visualizations of climate change. At the top of the page is a selection of the most popular videos, followed by lists of videos organized by theme.


Top 10 Climate Movies


  • The Home Frontier

    NASA explores. From its earliest days of sounding rockets and balloon-borne instruments, to Apollo and Hubble and missions to Mars. This mission of exploration has also always focused on our own corner of the universe, Earth - The Home Frontier. It is still the only planet we've ever been to.

    Credit: NASA

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  • Majestic Planet

    Land. Water. Fire. Ice. These elements are basic ingredients that make up planet Earth. Take a moment to admire the magnificent spectacle of our stunning home planet from the perspective of space.

    Credit: NASA JPL

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  • Piecing Together the Temperature Puzzle

    The past decade has been the hottest ever recorded since global temperature records began 150 years ago. This video discusses the impacts of the sun's energy, Earth's reflectance and greenhouse gasses on global warming.

    Credit: NASA

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  • Frozen Earth

    Ice covers 10 percent of Earth's surface and helps moderate the planet's temperature. Glaciers and ice sheets around the world are melting at an alarming rate. By keeping an eye on Earth's ice from space, NASA satellites help us understand the global effects of climate change.

    Credit: NASA JPL

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  • Feeling the Sting of Climate Change

    By comparing bee data to satellite imagery, NASA research scientist Wayne Esaias uses honey bees as tiny data collectors to understand how climate change is affecting pollination and plants.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • A Tour of the Cryosphere 2009

    The cryosphere is Earth's solid water: snow, sea ice, glaciers, permafrost, ice sheets, and icebergs. Direct measurements can be difficult to obtain, so scientists use satellites to observe the cryosphere and to monitor changes.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Oceans of Climate Change

    Oceanographer Josh Willis discusses the heat capacity of water, performs an experiment to demonstrate heat capacity using a water balloon and describes how water's ability to store heat affects Earth's climate.

    Credit: NASA JPL

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  • Aquarius: Salt of the Sea

    Salinity plays a major role in global ocean circulation and changes in salinity may impact regional and global climates. NASA's Aquarius mission is painting a global picture of our planet's salty waters.

    Credit: NASA

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  • Carbon and Climate Change in 90 Seconds

    By burning coal and oil, people are adding old carbon to the atmosphere faster than plants and the oceans can take it out. The carbon in the atmosphere acts like a blanket trapping heat and making the planet warmer. NASA carbon expert Peter Griffiths explains.

    Credit: NASA

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  • A Year of Observing the Salty Seas

    Salinity is the amount of salt dissolved in seawater, which influences the water cycle. This visualization celebrates a year of successful Aquarius observations at various locations around the globe.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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Water


Atmosphere


  • Piecing Together the Temperature Puzzle

    The past decade has been the hottest ever recorded since global temperature records began 150 years ago. This video discusses the impacts of the sun's energy, Earth's reflectance and greenhouse gasses on global warming.

    Credit: NASA

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  • Taking Earth's Temperature

    Earth's climate is changing at an unprecedented rate. This video explores climate modeling and other tools that NASA scientists use to take the Earth's temperature.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • 27 Storms: Arlene to Zeta

    27 named storms formed in the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, which broke many records including the most hurricanes, the most category 5 hurricanes, and the most intense hurricane ever recorded in the Atlantic.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Hello Crud

    Aerosols are small particles suspended in the air. Glory's APS instrument will help researchers understand the properties, the global distribution, and the chemical composition of natural and anthropogenic aerosols and clouds.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Towers in the Tempest

    Hurricane intensification can be caused by phenomenon called 'hot towers', which form as air spirals inward towards the eye and is forced rapidly upwards, accelerating the movement of energy into high altitude clouds.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Striking a Solar Balance

    Earth's climate depends on energy from the Sun. The Total Irradiance Monitor on NASA's Glory mission will continue measuring solar irradiance, which will contribute to the long-term climate record.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Exploring Ozone

    Leading atmospheric NASA scientist, Dr. Paul Newman discusses the status of the stratospheric ozone hole, including what causes the ozone hole to form and the role climate change will play in future years.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Supercomputing the Climate

    Go behind-the-scenes of the NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS), a state-of-the-art supercomputing facility capable of running complex models that give a picture of how Earth's climate is changing.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Know Your Earth: Earth Observing Fleet Studies Climate

    With the help of an animated astronaut, this video explains how climate change affects the ocean, land, atmosphere and ice sheets around the world. It also explains how NASA's Earth-observing satellite fleet enables scientists to gather accurate data and understand those changes.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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Frozen Places


  • Frozen Earth

    Ice covers 10 percent of Earth's surface and helps moderate the planet's temperature. Glaciers and ice sheets around the world are melting at an alarming rate. By keeping an eye on Earth's ice from space, NASA satellites help us understand the global effects of climate change.

    Credit: NASA JPL

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  • Earth's Climate Gets a Checkup: Operation IceBridge

    The Operation IceBridge Mission is an unprecedented six-year mission to study the Earth's polar regions, not through the lens of a satellite, but from onboard an airplane. IceBridge is the largest airborne survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • A Tour of the Cryosphere 2009

    The cryosphere is Earth's solid water: snow, sea ice, glaciers, permafrost, ice sheets, and icebergs. Direct measurements can be difficult to obtain, so scientists use satellites to observe the cryosphere and to monitor changes.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

    › Play video › Download video

  • Arctic Sea Ice 101

    A fast-paced interview with NASA climate scientist Tom Wagner, where he provides a look at the state of Arctic sea ice in 2009 and discusses NASA's role in monitoring the cryosphere.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Sea Ice 2008

    Arctic sea ice has shrunk dramatically in the last few decades. If recent trends in the melt rate continue, the Arctic Ocean could be ice free in the summer much sooner than previously thought.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Climate Change and Polar Ice

    Dr. Waleed Abdalait's lecture, entitled "Are We Waking Sleeping Giants?" discussing the vital importance played by the solid part of our planet's water inventory.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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  • Guided Tour of Antarctica Flyover

    This guided tour of the area surrounding McMurdo Station in Antarctica uses the Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (LIMA). It's a great way to experience the frozen continent without any risk of frostbite.

    Credit: NASA Scientific Visualization Studio

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Life


Animations

Water

Atmosphere

Frozen Places

Land And Life